The End of an Epoch, a World Without Film

Some of my happiest moments are caught on film. My childhood was one filled with the sound of 35mm film rewound — either manually or electronically — the slow, loud click of the shutter and the blinding flash, which was sometimes a magic cube, purchased separately, and attached to the camera. There was the excitement and mystery and anticipation of waiting to see what the photos looked like once they were developed.

Kodak film

First, darkrooms across America disappeared as the Digital Revolution took hold. Kodak, once the giant that owned a monopoly on the memories that we keep, went bankrupt. And today, it’s hard to develop the moments we’ve seared on film.

That has slowly disappeared.

Photos are instantaneous. There’s no need to wait three days to find out that someone closed their eyes in the photo or whether the lighting was right or if we caught junior at the very moment he blew out his birthday candles. There are no limits to the number of photos we can snap or store. And sharing photos is easy now, just a text or a post away.

Although I love the convenience of digital, and I use my iPhone camera far more than my point and shoot or DSLR, there is something about film: some romance, or poignant emotional attachment. So, when I had film to develop, and had to call four different places to find someone who still develops film, and then found that my black and white exposures would have to go elsewhere, I was a little sad.

It’s the end of an epoch. And that is bittersweet.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s